It’s True: The Japanese Tea Ceremony ritual does take 2 hours.
Here’s why…

If you’re thinking ‘tea’, and a friendly gathering of friends comes to mind, then think again. This is a spiritual Ritual.

Japanese Tea Cups

Here is a Japanese Tea Ceremony Description, so you know what you’re going into.

Prepare yourself for a very slow pace, but it’s worth it.

Green tea is certainly the most popular beverage in Japan, but the Japanese tea ceremonies are more of a spiritual ritual. Each aspect of the ceremony is symbolic.

Many locals today still practice the ceremony as a spiritual balance to their hectic daily life.
Tokyo Restaurant usually serve green Japanese tea to every table, free of charge. This is a lovely welcoming gesture.

7 Secrets Of Japanese Tea Ceremonies

Here is a quick Japanese tea Ceremony Description –

You are requested to sit on the Tatami (traditional floor covering) with your legs folded underneath you.

Don’t panic if this posture is impossible for you to hold for more than 30 seconds. Most westerners feel the same.

No one outside Japan was raised up doing so on a regular basis. Locals will not hold this against you. Sit in a way that is comfortable for you.
Some ceremony rooms have small chairs or wooden benches.You are welcomed with a bow. No words are spoken.

The host of the enters with the bowl containing a tea whisk, and a scoop.
The whisk is used to create a thin paste from water and a special type of powdered green Japanese tea called Macha.

The paste is whisked into a thick liquid.Macha is served in an individual cup called Yunomi which has no handles.

The Macha is drunk hot and without sugar or cream. The same bowl is shared by everyone.

A ceremony will take an hour or so. The pace of the ceremony is something that western culture is not familiar with.
But if you can find the right attitude within yourself, you’ll get the chance to experience a very basic part of Japans culture.

What’s Behind Japanese Tea Ceremony Ritual

The people here in Japan treat the ceremony as an art form.

They use it as a sort of meditation – a way to detach themselves from the daily routine and to attain inner peace.

A good Japanese tea Ceremony Description would be to say that every element of the ritual is symbolic.

Nothing is accidental – even the number of times you have turn the cup before you drink from it.

The Japanese tea sets are always very beautiful – made from Lacquer, bamboo, and ceramics.

The room is also decorated in a way that reflects the seasons, in very natural colors, very toned down.

4 Tokyo Places For Japanese Tea Ceremonies

  • The ceremonies are held at several places. Some of the Japanese tea gardens in Tokyo have a small tea house, where you can participate in a certain part of the ritual, usually a shorter version of it.
    This is not the Japanese Tea Ceremony ritual, it’s just a taste of Japans culture. Perhaps it’s a good peek into the ceremony , after which you can decide if you want to go for the ‘real thing’.
  • If you’d like to participate in the full Japanese tea ceremonies, I would recommend this Tea Ceremony Tour
    This tour can help you reach a deeper understanding of Japan culture, and you can ask ANYTHING on your mind about this bizarre Ritual.
  • The Suntory museum of art holds a ceremony every second week on Thursday. No reservation is required. The ceremonies are held at 13:00, 14:00 and 15:00. It costs 1,000 yen for the Japanese tea ceremony ritual and Japanese Desserts, in addition to the museum admission.
  • Hyatt hotel in Shinjuku holds the ceremony on the 41st floor. On a bright day you can even see Mt. Fuji.

  • Hyatt hotel in Shinjuku holds the ceremony on the 41st floor. On a bright day you can even see Mt. Fuji.
  • Top Japanese Tea Ceremony History Tips

    The ceremony was introduced from China 700 years ago, when Zen Buddhist monks started to develop this art form.

    But it was only 500 years ago that Sen No Rikkyu began to change the simple ceremony into a ritual.

    It was formalized as a ceremony towards the end of the Heian Period (1185 AD) when military clans began fighting between them for power, pushing Japan into civil wars.

    The Samurai warriors found the ritual very relaxing, and used it as a kind of training for mental self-control.

    Continue Reading:

    Japanese Desserts

    Learn How to make Green Tea

    More on the health benefits of the Japanese Diet

    Entertainment In Japan

    Back from Japanese tea Ceremony Description to Tokyo Attractions

    Back from Japanese tea Ceremony Description to Things to Do In Tokyo

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